England's liver disease crisis: Heavy boozing and obesity to blame as 'silent killer' claims one in 10 …


England is in the grip of a liver disease crisis caused by alcohol abuse and soaring obesity levels, health chiefs warn.

Dubbed the “silent killer”, it is responsible for almost 12% of deaths in men aged 40 to 49.

People living in some of the country’s most deprived areas are eight times more likely to die from it. Vanessa Hebditch, of the British Liver Trust, called for more help and support to treat cases early.

“People are dying of liver damage younger and younger, with the average age of death now being mid-50s,” she said, adding it was now common to have younger ­individuals waiting for a liver transplant or even dying on the wards.

Nearly 90% of cases are down to booze and obesity or linked to drug use

Public Health England’s “liver atlas” shows Blackpool has the highest avoidable death rate among under-75s, with 30.1 per 100,000 people dying from liver disease. It drops to 3.9 in South Norfolk.

Prof Julia Verne, of PHE, warned the disease “creeps up and shows itself when it’s often too late”.

Nearly 90% of cases are down to booze and obesity or linked to drug use.



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